Category Archives: Creative

Assen 14 augustus 1946 Albertus Gerardus Conard BERT

Assen 14 augustus 1946
Als een vuurteken en onder het zonneteken LEEUW wordt er een creatieve en actieve organisator geboren.

Het getal 5
De vibratie van het getal 5 hoort bij de planeet Mercurius. Het vertegenwoordigt communicatie, beweging en veelzijdigheid. Het is het getal van het intellect en van modelinge en schriftelijke expressie.
Hij wordt beinvloed door het getal 5 omdat hij op de 14de van de maand geboren is. Mensen die op de 5de geboren zijn, staan vooral onder de invloed van dit getal. Dat geldt ook voor degenen die op de 14de geboren zijn.

Wisselwerking met het zonneteken Leeuw:
Dank zij zijn opvallend veelzijdige kracht harmoniseert dit getal met het zonneteken of staat er lijnrecht tegenover, afhankelijk van de stemming ven het moment. De aard van het moment is uiterst veranderlijk en het aanpassingvermogen is groot, zodat deze mensen het ene moment met zichzelf in harmonie leven als ze dat willen, en het andere in onvrede met zichzelf. Het is nooit eenvoudig deze mensen echt te leren kennen. Hun dromen veranderen als kwikzilver.

De betekenis van de 5-vibratie
De volgende definitie van het getal 5 geldt wederom zowel voor personen als voor entiteiten. Mensen met dit getal bezitten een grote natuurlijke charme en zijn in het algemeen van nature hoffelijk. Fouten en onnauwkeurigheden weten ze snel op te sporen en ze aarzelen niet erop te wijzen. Ze zijn zeer kritisch en niet in staat fouten te negeren (zowel die van zichzelf als van anderen).

Beweging en Uitdaging
het getal 14 op de geboortedag houdt verband met magnetische communicatie met het publiek door middel van schrijven, publiceren, en alle middelen van moderne media.
Parelgrijs lichtgroen en zilver zijn de kleuren die hem goed doen.

Bekende leeuwen:
Woody Harrelson, Eriq LaSalle, Jennifer Lopez, Amelia Earhart, Matt LeBlanc, Iman, Sandra Bullock, Kevin Spacey, Mick Jagger, Carl Jung, Stanley Kubrick, Confucius, Peggy Fleming, Beatrix Potter, Jacqueline Kennedy Onasis, Paul Taylor, Peter Jenning, Hilary Swank, Lisa Kudrow, Arnold Schwarzenegger, Wesley Snipes, Bill Berry, Jerry Garcia, Coolio, James Bladwin, Martin Sheen, Martha Stewart, Tony Bennett, Percy Bysshe Shelley, Raoul Wallenberg, Billy Bob Thornton, Neil Armstrong, Lucille Ball, Andy Warhol, David Duchovny, Dustin Hoffman, Whitney Houston, Gillian Anderson, Melanie Griffith, Antonio Banderas, Rosanna Arquette, Alex Haley, Mark Knopfler, Alfred Hitchcock, David Cosby, Halle Berry, Steve Martin, Earvin “Magic” Johnson, Marcia Gay Harden, Ben Affleck, Madonna, Angela Bassett, Sean Penn, Brenda Carlisle, Robert de Niro, Edward Norton, Robert Redford, Christian Slater, Matthew Perry, Bill Clinton, Connie Chung, Isaac Hayes, Alicia Witt, Wilt Chamberlaine, Tori Amos, Jennifer Lopez, Antonio Banderas, Steve Carell, Barack Obama, Casey and Ben Affleck, Whitney Houston, Fidel Castro, George Bernard Shaw, Madonna, Andy Warhol, Robert Redford, Dustin Hoffman, Alfred Hitchcock, Mae West, Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, Robert De Niro, Arnold Schwarzenegger, Stanley Kubrick, Peter O’Toole, Emily Bronte, Bill Clinton.
1987 Linda Goodman’s Sterrentekens ” de geheime codes van het universum” Uitgegeven Uitgeverij Kosmos BV ISBN 90 215 1349

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Filed under Communication, Creative, family, Uncategorized, Winner

The ‘I Think’ Syndrome Destroys Many a Campaign

It Doesn’t Matter If You Like an Idea, Will the Target Audience Like It?
By: Darryl Ohrt Published: October 31, 2012

How many times in a brainstorming meeting have we heard statements that begin “I think that …,” followed by a personal experience related to the idea at hand. Or one of the team will say something like, “I would never watch that,” in reference to a proposed concept.
When conceiving ideas, we all want to relate to our audience target, and identify with the market. But the reality is, our targets are far different than most of us as individuals. Comments like these have killed great concepts, and can lead ridiculous concepts to execution and launch.
We demand comprehensive creative briefs prior to digging into a project. So why are we so apt to throw them aside in favor of a personal opinion? Because we’re bad scientists.
In psychology, personal construct theory professes that people act as scientists, channeling their thoughts and actions based on what they predict and anticipate. A 35-year-old single, male marketer might expect that a 45-year-old mom with three kids will act in a particular manner, based on his personal experiences. But does he have the life experience to properly identify with a busy mom?
As creative people, we’re opinionated. We want great ideas to see the light. We like our own ideas and project their success on our intended targets. And this is mostly wrong.
How can you avoid bad science? As a practice, I’ve done my best to remove “I think…” from rationalization of concepts. It’s a simple trick, but it forces you to focus on the core rationale for what you’re presenting — not why you think it’s important or destined for success. A response of “the target has shown a propensity toward this type of entertainment” is more impressive than “I think this will be huge. I know that I would totally use it.” Whenever possible, prove it out with research, strategy, evidence or experience.
Sounds like common sense, right? It should be, but once you begin listening for it, you’ll be surprised at how many clients, accounts and creative people suffer from the “I think…” syndrome. In some circles, it’s an epidemic. I’ve heard the phrase uttered by junior creatives, senior creatives and people who should really know better.
It’s time we put science and experience before opinion. I think … we can do better
.
ABOUT THE AUTHOR
Darryl Ohrt is a former punk rocker, professional internet surfer and executive creative director at Carrot Creative in NYC. He’s one of the three super-hot bloggers that make up AdVerve, and admits to knowing just enough about the creative business to be dangerous. Keep your distance.

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If Steve Jobs Had Applied His Talents To Energy And Climate Change

FC Expert Blog

By Boyd Cohen

Steve Jobs created innovative products that change the world of technology. Imagine the other industries he could have disrupted.
The anecdotes and stories of Steve Jobs’ career continue to pour in, with the sad news of a life cut too short by cancer. Like many Fast Company readers, I have been a fan of what Steve Jobs and Apple have managed to do over the past decade or so. I also own an iPad 2, an iPhone 4, and a MacBook Air. As has been written many times, Jobs’s genius helped Apple to reinvent at least three different industries (computing, mobile phones, and music).

I began to reflect today on what Steve Jobs meant to those industries he reinvented. Even competitors like Bill Gates have praised Steve for how he has innovated and changed the face of so many industries. He set a high bar inside Apple and forced his competitors to “innovate or die.” Given that my focus is on profitable innovations for the low-carbon economy, I thought it would be interesting to consider what the U.S. would look like if Steve Jobs had applied his passions to reinventing the energy industry and related systems.

Passion and Commitment to Change the World
The first thing we know is that Jobs would have been relentless in his pursuit to reinvent the ways that we interact with, consume and produce energy. Steve Jobs only spent mental energy on big ideas that could change the world that he was truly passionate about: “The only way to do great work is to love what you do. If you haven’t found it yet, keep looking,” he said. And: “Try to make a difference in this world and contribute to the higher good. You’ll find it gives more meaning to your life and it’s a great antidote to boredom.”

Telling the Right Story–It’s Not About Climate Change, Stupid
One of the biggest failures of the environmental and climate change movement has been its lack of proper storytelling. One of the best attempts to tell the story about climate change was Al Gore’s Inconvenient Truth book and movie project. I have to give him props for raising awareness of climate change by trying to explain, sometimes with some technological wizadry, why the climate is changing and why humans are partially to blame.
However, if Steve Jobs were Al Gore, he would have done this completely differently. He would not try to scare people with the doom and gloom of climate change. If Steve Jobs wanted to change the dialogue and collective consciousness about this challenge, he would have done it in a way that inspires optimism and excitement about the convenient solutions that will make our lives better. My friend Peter Byck has tried to do this through his documentary, Carbon Nation, and my co-author Hunter Lovins and I tried to do the same with Climate Capitalism. But imagine if Steve Jobs were telling the story about how much better his new GPS and smart grid-linked EV mass transit system would allow us to get anywhere we wanted to go, faster and smarter than we ever have before.

He Would Make Public Transit Exciting
North Americans generally think that public transit sucks. And to be honest, most of our public transit systems are pretty bad–we often see long waits for buses that are frequently late at stops that are exposed to the elements, and are usually still stuck using the same roads that all the other vehicles use (meaning they aren’t very fast, either). I am convinced that if Steve Jobs had been in the role of, say , Mayor of Los Angeles, he would have introduced some radical innovation to the public transit system, making it cooler than using your own car.
Trying to channel Steve Jobs is impossible, but whatever his solution, I bet it would be faster than single occupancy vehicles, make more use of smart technology, be powered by renewables, generate more energy than it consumed, and send excess energy back to a brilliant grid.
And what would a discussion about Steve Jobs’ talents be without considering how he might bring his design aesthetic to any innovation? Transit would be cool because he would design it to be so. It would be sleek and sophisticated, yet simple. Touch screens would allow passengers to know exactly when their transit vehicle was arriving and when they would arrive at their destination, thanks to GPS and other tools we haven’t thought of yet.
A Brilliant (Not Just Smart) Grid
I recently wrote about the challenges of smart grid adoption in the U.S.–something that poses the potential to revolutionize how we produce, distribute and consume energy. If Steve Jobs were the CEO of an energy company, even a mainstream oil and gas company like Shell, I think he would have seen the writing on the wall a long time ago and made a major shift into renewables as well as the convergence of IT and energy. He would convert a company focused on outdated paradigms into the next big thing, turning the potential smart grid into a brilliant grid.
In his words: “Innovation has no limits. The only limit is your imagination. It’s time for you to begin thinking out of the box. If you are involved in a growing industry, think of ways to become more efficient; customer friendly; and easier to do business with. If you are involved in a shrinking industry-get out of it quick and change before you become obsolete; out of work or out of business. And remember that procrastination is not an option here. Start innovating now.”
And of course there would be large scale adoption of the brilliant grid technology because again, it would be easy and maybe even fun to use. The design of the systems used by consumers (i.e. smart meters and appliances) would be so intuitive and elegant that no one would even think about complaining about low-level radiation from smart meters technology. Smart meters would become the thing everyone needs to have in their home.
I know that Steve Jobs had his critics. But more often then not he proved them wrong. He was a once-in-a-generation genius at reinventing industries. Through his storytelling and innovation skills, he easily could have reinvented the dialogue about climate change, changed public perception and use of public transit, and accelerated the adoption of a super smart grid. Maybe there is someone else on the horizon who will be the next generation’s Steve Jobs, prepared to tackle some of the world’s most pressing problems– water and food shortage, climate change and energy. If there is, they probably wouldn’t use focus groups either.

Boyd Cohen, Ph.D., LEED AP, is a climate strategist helping to lead communities, cities and companies on the journey towards the low carbon economy. Dr. Cohen is the co-author of Climate Capitalism: Capitalism in the Age of Climate Change.

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How FACEBOOK makes your global brand feel local

National Brands Are Only Beginning to Understand What Local Businesses Already Know About the Social Network

Published: July 18, 2011
Dave Williams
One of the greatest aspects of Facebook for marketers — maybe the greatest — is that consumers willingly share their information, opening the door to the precise targeting that advertisers dream of. Yet many brands still look at Facebook merely as a way to acquire fans, with little thought given to monetizing that list. Very few national or international brands take full advantage of Facebook’s targeting capabilities. At this point, between 60% and 70% of Facebook’s ad revenue comes from small businesses.
Such businesses are realizing the benefits of targeting consumers on a local level, similar to the way small businesses take advantage of radio, newspaper and billboard advertising to drive local sales. National brands shouldn’t feel excluded — they, too, can engage their audiences on a more intimate level by targeting locally. And unlike traditional display, Facebook gives advertisers national scale on a very local level. Unfortunately, many are leaving this opportunity untapped.
There are multiple uses for localized display on Facebook, including local events, new store openings, holiday offers and other local promotions. Consider a cellphone service provider’s marketing strategy. In addition to the centralized national marketing team, such companies often have local marketing groups responsible for particular regions. Agencies typically like to maintain a single point of communication, pushing the local groups out of the Facebook advertising strategy.
But think of the possibilities for customizing on a local level: New store openings, local promotions, even extended 4G coverage in the region are all valuable opportunities to engage consumers on the local level. It makes little sense to ignore the local angle.
Localized creative is effective at generating awareness and ultimately driving people into stores, building higher order value, and powering transactions. Think of it like the Sunday circular that runs in the newspaper every week. Instead of buying ads in the paper, brands can push weekly specials out to localized audiences, and do so far more efficiently with mass reach and frequency.
We recently ran a campaign to promote a celebrity in-store appearance for a cell phone provider. By targeting the youth market in that region with customized Facebook display ads, we achieved a 0.26% click-through rate, relatively high for any type of display. That high CTR foreshadowed massive attendance at the in-store event, completely surpassing expectations.
Groupon and Living Social are two other companies that know how to effectively leverage this local display strategy, and you’ve undoubtedly seen one or both companies advertise deals in your city in Facebook’s right-hand column. Both companies have national reach, but their business model operates on a local level, so proper targeting pays dividends in scale.
Starbucks is the most popular global brand on Facebook in terms of fans, but it can still use local strategy effectively to maximize reach and frequency in high-density markets. Every Starbucks offers the same products, but consumers often develop relationships with the brand through their neighborhood location. Starbucks often leverages this brand association via campaigns that give consumers coupons for free pastries with a drink purchase. The campaign is national in scope, but it applies the advertising weight at a localized level to maximize consumer appeal and revenues when they visit their favorite Starbucks store.
Nor is local limited to geographic targeting. Brands can target students at specific colleges and universities with unique back-to-school offers, introducing new residents to the local franchises. This is a popular strategy as brands compete for share of mind and wallet of students as they return to school this fall.
Brands traditionally disregard local online advertising because it seems time-consuming and difficult to scale. Localized websites draw small audiences, which offer very little ROI. Facebook, on the other hand, makes it easy to look at which percentage of the population will see your local message, and then build a national campaign customized and targeted on a local level at a reach and scale not previously attainable through traditional display or search advertising.
The local companies currently running campaigns on Facebook rely on the social network’s self-serve ad tool. That’s great for small companies trying to reach a few thousand consumers, but it breaks down for brands trying to reach tens of thousands of people in multiple locales. Doing that requires an entire team customizing and targeting the creative, and there’s just no way to make money that way. Facebook’s direct-sales team doesn’t offer local customization because of the time required.
Fortunately, companies with access to Facebook’s Ad API can automate the process, giving brands fully customized campaigns for individual locations on national (or even international) scale with customized targeting and creative at a fraction of the time and effort.
Marketing on a local level maximizes the impact of your marketing campaigns on Facebook by minimizing advertising waste and maximizing your reach and frequency with the right audiences, making the brand offering more appealing. Customizing an ad makes your brand message relevant to a consumer on a level where he or she can easily engage and take action. It combines the reach and targeting capabilities of Facebook in order to maximize brand awareness and drive consumers into an actual location to make a purchase — which is, after all, the purpose of marketing.
ABOUT THE AUTHOR
Dave Williams is the CEO of Blinq Media.

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Ad Age Digital A-List: Kinect

Microsoft Invited Gamers to Drop Controller and Get off the Couch, but Interface Has Potential Use for Medicine, Education, Advertising and Beyond

By: Beth Snyder Bulik Published: February 27, 2011

Microsoft Kinect’s advertising lure of “You are the controller” appealed to many remote-weary households this holiday. About 8 million of them, in fact, in just the first 60 days after its November launch.
Of course, a $500 million launch budget with co-marketing brand partners such as Pepsi, Kellogg, and Burger King didn’t hurt either. But all said, it wasn’t the marketing blast that propelled Kinect to the Digital A List (Microsoft is no stranger to massive product launches; evidence the reported $500 million launch marketing budgets also for Vista and Windows Phone 7) but the personality of the product, along with its positioning and potential.
Kinect took the idea of motion-sensitive gaming, launched successfully by Nintendo with its Wii console in 2007 and advanced it, not only by adding more gaming “wow” but also by cultivating the potential to go beyond gaming. Reviewers couldn’t hide their delight at the ability to control game play with simple gestures and voice commands.
And that “natural user interface,” as Microsoft calls it, has been hacked and hailed for its possible uses beyond the gaming world, from medicine and education to advertising and e-commerce. Coming this spring is a Microsoft-sanctioned Kinect for Windows software developers’ kit for noncommercial use, allowing “academic researchers and enthusiasts” inside access to Kinect technology. (A commercial version is in the works for an undecided later release.)
As Steve Clayton, editor at Microsoft’s Next at Microsoft blog, wrote: “The possibilities are endless. Natural and intuitive technologies such as Kinect can be more than just a great platform for gaming and entertainment. They open up enormous opportunities across a wide variety of scenarios, including addressing societal issues.”
But just as important — for now, anyway — is that Kinect has revitalized the aging five-year-old Xbox 360 console. Not only does it give Xbox 360 owners an innovative way to play, but it gives potential gamers interested in the hands-free technology a reason to buy Xbox 360 consoles. Xbox 360 was the only console to see an increase in sales for year-over-year sales in December 2010, and it was a hefty 42%, according to Microsoft.
Kinect’s 8 million in consoles sold during the holidays is not only 5 million more than Microsoft’s initial prediction of 3 million, but also comparatively brisk when looking at other top-selling tech products’ first 60 days, such as Apple’s iPad (2 million) and iPhone (less than 1 million), and the motion-sensitive predecessor Wii, which sold more than 3 million during that time.
Of course, those are a bit apples-to-oranges comparisons — Kinect is an accessory, less expensive and not a brand-new product category with breakthrough hurdles to overcome like the others. However, it is still an undeniable out-of-the-gate success.

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Ad Age Digital A-List: Google Creative Labs

The Two Men Behind Android’s Little Green Robot Are Redefining Search Giant’s Consumer Brand

By: Michael Learmonth Published: February 27, 2011

When Google began recruiting agency execs in 2007, it had no reputation for marketing anything, much less itself. Andy Berndt was co-president of Ogilvy, New York, at the time, with no desire to leave. Robert Wong was creative director at Arnold Worldwide. “When they called me, it was an odd job description,” Mr. Berndt said. “But it’s like when a spaceship lands in your backyard, and the door opens. You just get in.”

That spaceship became Google Creative Lab, responsible for marketing everything from Android and Chrome to Google Docs and the Nexus One, and even its core product — the one that needs no marketing — search. It’s also defining what it means to be a creative professional inside a culture driven by scientists and engineers.
Google Lab’s projects tend toward the lo-fi and emphasize brainy over glitzy, with one big, fat multimillion-dollar exception: “Parisian Love,” the web video that Google placed during the 2010 Super Bowl. But even that was Google all the way. The video itself was created by a group of design students recruited to, among other things, “remind people what they love about Google search.” But the end product had an added effect. “It summed up why we come to work every day,” Mr. Berndt said. “People at Google were proud of it. It explained to people how we feel about what we do better than speeches or any PowerPoint could.”
Google’s traditional ethos is that the product “should win on it own merits.” But the Super Bowl ad showed the founders are open to any idea, even if it means spending a few million to boost morale. “The expectation from the founders is how big you can think and what sort of insane impact can you have,” Mr. Wong said. “For a creative person, you have a shot at doing for the Google brand what the engineers do for the Google brand.”
The very first work created by Google Creative Lab was the familiar little green Android space robot, now a powerful symbol of Google’s Android brand. But Android isn’t about Google; it’s meant to be repurposed by carriers and customized by users. Hence, earlier this year, an Android app, Androidify, which allows anyone to make themselves into a little green bot. That app soared to No. 1 in the Android Market.

Media spending is still tiny compared with other big consumer brands: only $11 million on measured ad spending in 2009 and $29 million in the first nine months of 2010, according to Kantar Media. (Verizon, by comparison, spent more than $3 billion in 2009.) Messrs. Berndt and Wong admit that after years of working on the biggest stages, going small is an adjustment. The Super Bowl ad was a one-off, which doesn’t mean it won’t happen again — just that the Creative Lab’s output is going to look more like the Arcade Fire video “The Wilderness Downtown,” made to show the capabilities of HTML5, but also the possibilities for a music video. Viewers can input their own addresses (or the addresses of their childhood homes) and see images from the neighborhood integrated into the video.
“It lets you do things in a browser that makes it feel like that browser is your computer,” Mr. Wong said. A demo video, sure, but wrapped in a bigger question: “Is this the future of the music video?”

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